2017 Spring Events

Endangered Data Week Poster

Endangered Data at Boston College

April 19, 3–5 pm.
O’Neill Library, Digital Studio, Room 205

Are you worried about the availability and preservation of publicly accessible data? Boston College will be hosting  events for Endangered Data Week. On April 19, our Data Refuge event will focus on pulling data.gov data & metadata for BC grants from the NEH, IMLS, NEA, and other federal agencies. NEA, NEH, and IMLS data was identified specifically because there are already a number of efforts underway to preserve science and climate change data, but no visible effort to do the same for humanities and performing arts data.

This event is free and open to the public, but we kindly request that you register.

Spring Showcase

April 26, 3–5 pm.
O’Neill Library, Digital Studio, Room 205

Spring Showcase flyer

Please join the Digital Scholarship Group for our 2017 Spring Showcase! The Showcase will highlight faculty, student, and staff digital scholarship projects.

Schedule

3 – 3:10: Introduction
3:10 – 4:10: Showcase and demos

Speakers:
Dia Philippides, CENSUS of Modern Greek Literature
Carolyn Twomey, Making History Public
Eric Weiskott, Mapping Chaucer
Michael Noone, Burns Antiphoner
BC Digital Scholarship Initiatives

4:10 – 4:30: Q&A
4:30 – 5: Reception

This event is free and open to the public, but we kindly request that you register.

Coffee & Code

Visualize Your Data on an Interactive Map
February 14, 11-12:30 pm.
O’Neill Library, Digital Studio, Room 205

This session will introduce participants to the basics of using geographic data to create a visualization (map) with Carto, a web-based mapping and analysis tool. Several types of map layers will be explored. This session may be of interest to participants who are interested in visualizing historical data for humanities or social science projects or classroom use.

This event is free and open to the public, but we kindly request that you register.

 

RESCHEDULED: Build a Digital Exhibit with Omeka.net
March 21, 11-12:30 pm.
O’Neill Library, Digital Studio, Room 205

Omeka is a free, open-source content management system, which is being used by libraries, archives, museums, and scholars to display content and scholarship in a flexible and interactive setting. This workshop will provide participants with an overview of the platform and teach them how to create and describe items (i.e. photos, text, maps), organize items within collections, and publish content for the public. In addition, metadata standards (i.e. Dublin Core) will be discussed during the workshop as they relate to creating descriptions of items in Omeka. A list of resources and tips will be provided to participants. This workshop will appeal to participants who are interested in curating a digital exhibit or collections, which can include various formats, such as text/notation, images, maps, and multimedia. For more information about Omeka, visit http://omeka.net.

This event is free and open to the public, but we kindly request that you register.

 

Lexos: Easing Entry to Computational Studies with Digitized Texts
March 20, 11-12:30 pm.
O’Neill Library, Digital Studio, Room 205

In our experience, scholars who might like to perform computational analysis in their areas of expertise and/or wish to teach their students how to do so become discouraged too early in the game. This workshop will provide hands-on exposure to and practice with the free, open-source, web-based tool Lexos, including course materials that we have used in our interdisciplinary courses; our software is available at our GitHub repo. The workshop goal is to lower the barriers required for computer-assisted text analysis over a broad range of texts, including pre-modern and non-Western languages. Lexos requires no prerequisities to use, in fact a take away from the workshop is to stimulate your ideas for the many different ways to introduce students to computational analyses of texts. Participants are encouraged to arrive with a folder of text files of interest (raw text files, .txt, HTML, or XML required; .pdf and .docx formats are not handled).

Our work on Lexos as an entry-level tool for scholars of digitized texts is presently funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), Wheaton College (Norton, MA) and the Center for the Digital Humanities at California State University, Northridge reflects six years of development and testing, including use in our undergraduate classrooms. More information on our successful use in the classroom and in our own research (presently in Beowulf, classical Chinese, Tolkien, Poe, etc.) is available at our website.

This session will be taught by Wheaton College’s Michael D.C. Drout, Professor of English, Director of the Center for the Study of the Medieval; Mark D. LeBlanc, Prof. of Computer Science; and Kate Boylan, Digital Initiatives Librarian.

This event is free and open to the public, but we kindly request that you register.

 

Hacking Mirador
March 27, 11-12:30 pm.
O’Neill Library, Digital Studio, Room 205

Christopher Morse of Harvard University’s Arts & Humanities Research Computing department will visit Boston College on Monday, March 27 to lead a Coffee & Code session, Hacking Mirador, at 11 am. The goal of this tutorial is to introduce participants to the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) and the open-source IIIF image viewer Mirador. Together these tools support and enhance scholarly publications for the web, digital exhibits, and even course teaching materials.

Although IIIF has been adopted by a growing number of institutions around the world, there does not yet exist a single, common point of access or user interface for working with IIIF content on the fly. For this reason, this workshop aims to clarify the research needs of faculty, staff, and students in order to inform the development of a unified workspace going forward.

As a part of this tutorial, Christopher Morse will demonstrate how to retrieve and edit image manifests from Harvard’s collections, import them into the Mirador viewer, and create annotations for those images. In addition, the workshop features alternative IIIF image collections from partnering institutions and how they can be imported into Mirador as well.

This event is free and open to the public, but we kindly request that you register.

 

From Wrangling Citations to Visualizing Knowledge with Zotero
April 20, 11-12:30 pm.
O’Neill Library, Digital Studio, Room 205

This sessions will introduce participants to a lightweight tool for large-scale text analysis of documents in PDF format, enabling the user to discern distinctive features of a textual corpus, such as topics, locations, and personal names. Participants will be able to:

  • recognize whether or not the text of a PDF can be read by computers -create quality metadata for items in their Zotero library
  • create visualizations of large collections of items in their Zotero library using Paper Machines
  • frame a research question that visualizations created using Paper Machines could help to answer

This session will appeal to humanities scholars with minimal computational skills interested in seeing texts in new ways.

This event is free and open to the public, but we kindly request that you register.